Thoughts by Roger Ebert

Thoughts by Roger Ebert:

Popular Thoughts by Roger Ebert:- Roger Ebert was an author, journalist, historian and screenwriter who is respected as one of the best film-critics and an book of facts of film history. Ebert was the first film critic to win the Pulitzer Prize for critique. Roger Ebert initiated his campaign as a film critic writing for the Chicago Sun. Find out more about the Famous Critics of all time, including John Ruskin Thoughts.

He had also inscribed more than a dozen of collective reviews, almost 20 books and has associated his reviews with more than 200 newspapers. Ebert co-hosted the PBS show ‘Sneak Previews’ with Chicago Tribune critic Gene Siskel. They builded and trademarked the slogan “Two Thumbs Up,” which they used when both of them award the same film a positive thoughts.

Ebert was the most powerful film critic in Hollywood and his work, writings, thoughts, quotes and books are quiet appreciated thoughts by all. Ebert earned a star on the popular ‘Hollywood Walk of Fame’ in 2005 becoming first critic to earned this respect. Suggesting a compilation of Roger Ebert sayings, thoughts on Thanksgiving, thoughts on Marriage, love, death, cinema and more by Thoughts4ever.

 

Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Art

Thoughts by Roger Ebert Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Art Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Books Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Character Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Children Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Crime Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Critics Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Curiosity Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Empathy Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Film Thoughts by Roger Ebert About First Amendment Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Giving Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Human Nature Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Writing Roger Ebert Thoughts - American film Critic, Historian, Journalist Read & share top American film Critic, Journalist Roger Ebert Thoughts/quotes on Art, Books, Character, Empathy, Film, Giving, Writing at Thoughts4ever.

All good art is about something deeper than it admits.


Film has become a marketed commodity, and the opportunities and audiences for art cinema have grown smaller.


Art is the closest we can come to understanding how a stranger really feels.

Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Books

“The Lucky One” is at its heart a romance novel, elevated however by Nicholas Sparks’ persuasive storytelling. Readers don’t read his books because they’re true, but because they ought to be true.


The idea that a book can advise a woman how to capture a man is touchingly naive.


Anyone who reads advice books about romance has one problem to begin with: bad taste in literature.


We feel the same emotions for our ideas as we do for the real world, which is why we can cry while reading a book, or fall in love with movie stars.

Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Character

“Jason X” sucks on the levels of storytelling, character development, suspense, special effects, originality, punctuation, neatness and aptness of thought.


The instinctive ethical code of traditional Hollywood, the code by which characters like James Stewart, John Wayne and Henry Fonda lived, has been lost.


One of the weapons Marvel used in its climb to comic-book dominance was a willingness to invent new characters at a dizzying speed.


It is hard enough to be good at all, but to be good in comedy speaks for your character.

Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Children

Here is a children’s film made for the world we should live in, rather than the one we occupy.


An actress should never, ever, be asked to run beside a van in red disco boots for more than about half a block, and then only if her child is being kidnapped.


Teaching prejudice to a child is itself a form of bullying. You’ve got to be taught to hate.

Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Crime

Once you accept the notion that the state has the right to kill someone and the right to define what is a capital crime, aren’t you halfway there?


We are put on this planet only once, and to limit ourselves to the familiar is a crime against our minds.


To make others less happy is a crime.

Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Critics

All over the web there are some very good critics and it’s become for people who are interested.


When I had been a film critic for ten minutes, I treated Doris Day as a target for cheap shots.


I’m told we movie critics praise movies that are long and boring.


I lost faith in the Oscars the first year I was a movie critic – the year that Bonnie and Clyde didn’t win.

Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Curiosity

Socrates told us, “the unexamined life is not worth living.” I think he’s calling for curiosity, more than knowledge.


What I believe is that all clear-minded people should remain two things throughout their lifetimes: Curious and teachable.


The problem in life, maybe the central problem, is that so few people ever seem to have sufficient curiosity to do the job on us that we know we deserve.

Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Empathy

For me, the movies are like a machine that generates empathy.


The purpose of civilization and growth is to be able to reach out and empathize with other people.


Of all the arts, movies are the most powerful aid to empathy, and good ones make us into better people.


Movies that encourage empathy are more effective than those that objectify problems.

Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Film

James Cameron’s films have always been distinguished by ground-breaking technical excellence.


One difference between film noir and more straightforward crime pictures is that noir is more open to human flaws and likes to embed them in twisty plot lines.


It’s rare to find a film that goes for broke and says, ‘To hell with the consequences.’


‘Grand Illusion’ and ‘Rules of the Game’ are routinely included on lists of the greatest films, and deserve to be.

Thoughts by Roger Ebert About First Amendment

I begin to feel like most Americans don’t understand the First Amendment, don’t understand the idea of freedom of speech.

Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Giving

One of the gifts one movie lover can give another is the title of a wonderful film they have not yet discovered.


Because I don’t give the studios advanced quotes or an advanced look at my reviews.


(Guy) Pearce, as the hero, makes the mistake of trying to give a good and realistic performance. (Jeremy) Irons at least know what kind of movie he’s in, and hams it up accordingly.


I’ll tell you, I think that the Internet has provided an enormous boost to film criticism by giving people an opportunity to self publish or to find sites that are friendly.

Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Human Nature

Movies record human nature in a better way than any other art form, that’s for sure.


Vulgarity is when we don’t laugh. When we laugh, it’s merely human nature.


It is human nature to look away from illness. We don’t enjoy a reminder of our own fragile mortality.

Thoughts by Roger Ebert About Writing

When I write a political column for the Chicago Sun-Times, when liberals disagree with me, they send in long, logical e-mails explaining all my errors.


I find that when I am actually writing, I enter a zone of concentration too small to admit my troubles.


To say that George Lucas cannot write a love scene is an understatement; greeting cards have expressed more passion.


Just write, get better, keep writing, keep getting better. It’s the only thing you can control.

Facebook
Facebook
Google+
Google+
https://thoughts4ever.com/thoughts-by-roger-ebert">
Pinterest
Pinterest
Instagram